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claudine jaenichen

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Design for Emergency Management

dnem.org


DNEM encompasses award-winning global efforts from an interdisciplinary team to improve the lives of others during disasters. We are designers, scientists and communication specialists working with communities to make them safer applying evidence-based research and practice.

In 2018, DNEM held a design workshop with local emergency managers at Chapman University. Topics covered an introduction to understanding visual language, iconography, cognition factors in emergencies, rapid prototyping, evaluation, and ethics.


FEMA PrepTalks are given by subject-matter experts and thought leaders to spread new ideas, spark conversation, and promote innovative leadership for the issues confronting emergency managers over the next 20 years. FEMA PrepTalks are by invitation only and presented to a diverse audience of emergency personnel, community members, and leaders. More here: https://www.fema.gov/emergency-managers/practitioners/preptalks

tsunamiclear

TsunamiClear

TsunamiClear Maps transform data-driven and content heavy GIS maps that are traditionally used for internal decision-making to evidence supported public-facing maps that are useful and memorable for community members to plan for a tsunami evacuation, identify alternative evacuation routes, and discover routes that are not part of their everyday routine.

TsunamiClear considers how design supports cognitive variables including collective behavior, tunnel vision, and issues in temporary cognitive paralysis. The objective is to encourage cognitive recall of tsunami risk for residents, tourists, students, commuters, and employees.

TsunamiClear creates and distributes information and education that is coherent, cohesive, and memorable.

TsunamiClear maps are in 31 cities in California and funded by the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services:

San Diego County: Oceanside, City of San Diego, Coronado, Chula Vista, Del Mar, Encinitas, Imperial Beach, National City, Solana Beach Los Angeles County: Santa Monica, Venice Beach, Marina Del Rey, El Segundo, Harbor City, Malibu, Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach, Palos Verdes Estates, Rancho Palos Verdes, Redondo Beach Orange County: Huntington Beach, Laguna Beach, Newport Beach, Seal Beach, Sunset Beach Santa Barbara County: Santa Barbara San Francisco County: San Francisco Northern California: Pacifica, San Mateo State Parks, Half Moon Bay

fireclear

FireClear

Using visual standards developed by TsunamiClear, FireClear aims to produce public-facing risk literacy maps meant to improve the public’s understanding of wildfire risk as it relates to their surrounding area. FireClear is not meant to be used at the time of a wildfire, but instead, as a way to develop a cognitive map to improve recall and evacuation route options that differ from the ones taken during everyday routines.

FireClear Maps transform data-driven and content heavy GIS maps that are traditionally used for internal decision-making to evidence supported public-facing maps that are useful and memorable for community members to plan, identify alternative evacuation routes, and discover routes that are not part of their everyday routine.

FireClear considers how design supports cognitive variables including collective behavior, tunnel vision, and issues in temporary cognitive paralysis. The objective is to encourage cognitive recall of wildfire risk for residents, tourists, students, commuters, and employees.

FireClear improves transparency and communication between the public and emergency management. Like TsunamiClear, these maps create information and promote awareness that is coherent, cohesive, and memorable.

Within 3 years of the first map, FireClear maps are now in 18 cities in California:

Orange County: Aliso Viejo, Laguna Beach, Irvine Marin County: Novato, Town of Fairfax, Kentfield, Ross Valley, Central Marin, Greenbrae, East Corte Madera, San Rafael, Mill Valley, San Geronimo, Point Reyes/Inverness, Mill Valley, Nicasio, Panoramic, Southern Marin

Coronado School District K-12 Parent Reunification Plan
Nuclear Safety Campaign
QuakeClear: Public Earthquake Education Campaign
Active Shooting Preparedness Campaign

In time of crisis, communication is critical. It is not the amount of information but the quality of what is being understood effectively.

TAB: The Journal of Poetry and Poetics

TAB: The Journal of Poetry and Poetics

TAB: The Journal of Poetry & Poetics is a national and international journal of creative and critical writing. This new literary journal’s mission is to discover, support, and publish the contemporary poetry and writing about poetry; to provide a forum in which the poetic tradition is practiced, extended, challenged, and discussed by emerging and established voices; and to encourage wide appreciation of poetry and expand the audience for poems and writing about poetry.

The print issues of TAB: The Journal of Poetry & Poetics are special editions, each published at the beginning of the calendar year. These issues reflect Tab Journal’s mission to create an environment that celebrates poetry in various forms and venues. The annual print issue inaugurates a different design experience for every year and engages the reader with poetry as a material object and asks that the reader negotiate between image and text.

exhibition catalog for artist, lia halloran

A Body is a Space That Sees

FOR ARTIST, LIA HALLORAN


“A Body is a Space That Sees” is an Exhibition Catalog for Los Angeles artist, Lia Halloran.  This work “is a series of large-scale cyanotype works that source the history and discoveries of a group of women known as “Pickering’s Harem,” or later the “Harvard Computers,” who worked at the Harvard Observatory starting in the late 1800s through the first half of the 20th century”.—Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

Chino Creek Wetlands Park

Chino Creek Wetlands Park

Winning the bid for the Inland Empire Utilities Agency, I worked with public artist, Richard Turner, to design architectural elements and signage for a 22-acre park. Water quality, flood control, environmental restoration, urban development, recreation and water conservation were some of the park’s locational themes.

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